Get Adobe Flash player
Home

"First Lady Of Radio" ....Gone but never Forgotten

"FIRST LADY OF RADIO"

Roberta Franklin was a seasoned, social justice organizer living in Montgomery Alabama. Through her efforts, Roberta has garnered broad-based support from the general public and and national officials.

Several years ago, Roberta Franklin began to host a local radio talk show creating public conversations about hidden prisons and the people incarcerated in them. Good citizens of Alabama began to insist on sentencing law and prison reform.

By attracting a growing public audience of listeners year after year, Roberta and her wide-open conversations on Let the Truth Shine Radio Show led to citizen mobilization. Former prisoners, loved ones of inmates and their community supporters continue to organize today.

Ms. Franklin was named a "Soros Justice Fellow" by the Open Society Institute in 2004 for her activism in Alabama and her work with FMI. She also received the Excellence in Journalistic Broadcasting Award from The International Bannister Foundation, Critical Resistance South, Southern Center for Human Rights and the Patrick Crusade at the first Family Members of Inmates Convention in 2003.

Hosting meetings, marches and rallies that have drawn as many a two thousand participants, including notable political figures, Roberta Franklin founded and directs the Family and Friends of People Incarcerated, an organization that consists of relatives and friends of inmates throughout Alabama.

 

Roberta Franklin's call for a Million Family and Friends of Prisoners March on Washington D.C. on August 13, 2005 has been heard throughout the country.

Her relentless work for social justice brings Montgomery, Alabama another hard-won mark in the place of social justice history.

 

Ms. Franklin passed at her home on Saturday, January 5, 2013, surrounded by family friends.

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

Last Updated (Friday, 18 January 2013 18:56)

 

Artist Of the Month: T.K. Soul

TK SOUL: BORN TERENCE KIMBLE AUGUST 26TH. HOME STATE LOUISIANA (WINNFIELD). BEGAN HIS MUSICAL JOURNEY AT AGE 10 WHEN HE DISCOVERED HE COULD PLAY ANY INSTRUMENT HE CAME IN CONTACT WITH JUST BY EAR. HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC GREW IN HIS TEEN YEARS, AS HE WAS GREATLY INFLUENCED BY ENTERTAINERS HE SAW ON T.V. AND HEARD ON THE RADIO. BY AGE 13 HE WAS WRITING SONGS AND PLAYING GUITAR IN LOCAL AREA BANDS. FROM SCHOOL CHOIR TO CHURCH CHOIR JR. HIGH BAND TO HIGH SCHOOL BAND HIS TALENTS GREW VERY RAPIDLY. HE LEFT HOME AT 19 TRAVELING AND PERFORMING

Last Updated (Friday, 21 September 2012 17:08)

Read more...

 

Whats Happening

Black Voices - The Huffington Post
Black Voices news and blog articles from The Huffington Post
  • 13 Ghastly Money Mistakes That Could Come Back to Haunt You
    Dear Readers,

    The money decisions you make today can lead to either a secure or a scary financial future. Don't be tricked into being complacent. Think ahead, plan ahead -- and avoid these 13 money mistakes that could haunt you for years to come.


    1) Breaking your budget
    Treating yourself is fine as long as you're not living beyond your means. To create -- and stick to -- a realistic budget, make two lists: your necessary monthly expenses and your nice-to-haves. Can you cover both with your income? If not, get out the red pen and start crossing off the extras you can live without. Make those extras a goal and start saving for them. This way, you won't be haunted by bills you can't pay.

    2) Losing time on retirement savings
    Outliving your money is a scary thought. So retirement savings should come first -- even before saving for a house or a child's education. At least contribute enough to your company retirement plan to capture the maximum match. Then contribute more to either your 401(k) or an IRA, putting contributions on automatic. And remember, the earlier you start, the smaller the percentage of your salary you need to sock away.

    3) Being unprepared for the unexpected
    Unexpected expenses can jump out at you at any time. To protect yourself, set aside enough money to cover three to six months of essential expenses in an easily accessible savings or money market account or...
  • Open Letter to Kanye West: Ferguson Is Happening. Where Are You?
    Dear 'Ye,

    You have spent much of your career defying naysayers and the standards people have set for you. You refused to be intimidated by guys on the South Side of Chicago for your creativity. You broke free of being only a producer when you proved Jay Z wrong and became one of the biggest names in rap music. When music executives tried to control the content of your music, you released the now-infamous "Jesus Walks." When Nike would not give you creative control over Yeezys, you took a deal with Adidas instead.

    You are, by definition, defiant. And I love that about you.

    Many in our community applauded your gall to stand on national television next to Mike Myers and utter seven words that shook the nation: "George Bush doesn't care about black people." We praised your courage in the wake of the United States' failed response to Hurricane Katrina that ultimately resulted in the loss of many lives. You articulated the pain behind the tears many of us cried.

    Despite criticism of your "Kanye rants," people listen when you speak. Regardless of your delivery, many of us find value in your statements on classism and institutionalized racism. Your voice elicits responses from fans and critics alike.

    Having said that, Ferguson is happening. Where are you?

    I am deeply troubled by your sudden quietness in the midst of such powerful youth activism against police brutality and state violence. The...
  • Illinois Is Killing Black Opportunity
    Illinois is killing black opportunity

    Illinois is home to a vicious cycle that prevents its black residents from reaching their full potential, and too little attention is being paid to the numbers driving it.

    For starters, less than half of working-age black adults in Illinois are employed.

    Those who can find work make 25 percent less than Illinois' median household income of $56,250. The median household income for black Illinoisans is just $34,815, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2013 American Community Survey.

    But why?

    Part of what's driving this disparity in income and employment is the fact that so many in Illinois' black community are trapped in a public education system that is failing to prepare them to succeed.

    In the 2011-2012 school year, just 68 percent of black students graduated on time from Illinois' public school system, compared to 82 percent of the total student population.

    In Chicago, three out of 10 freshmen at Chicago Public Schools, or CPS, don't graduate on time. In 2009, the Chicago Sun-Times shared results from a report from the City Colleges of Chicago, or CCC, showing that of the more than 2,800 CPS high-school graduates heading straight into CCC, 71 percent needed remedial reading, 81 percent needed remedial English and 94 percent needed remedial math.

    This comes with sobering consequences. The dropout-to-prison pipeline is all too real...

On Air Dj

Polls

Joomla! is used for?
 

Who's Online

We have 4 guests online

Advertise Here!

LadeDj Radio Feed

Professor Cornel West was arrested today in Ferguson, MO as part of a protest group comprised of clergymen.  Get deets on the arrest...
Read more...
In today’s round-up of political fabness, we have the brand new  President Barack Obama cover of ROLLING STONE and new video...
Read more...
The First Family is spending their holidway weekend together. And they were spotted making their way to President Obama’s personal...
Read more...
Outspoken conservative Stacey Dash has inked a new deal right up her alley. Find out what she will be doing...
Read more...