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"First Lady Of Radio" ....Gone but never Forgotten

"FIRST LADY OF RADIO"

Roberta Franklin was a seasoned, social justice organizer living in Montgomery Alabama. Through her efforts, Roberta has garnered broad-based support from the general public and and national officials.

Several years ago, Roberta Franklin began to host a local radio talk show creating public conversations about hidden prisons and the people incarcerated in them. Good citizens of Alabama began to insist on sentencing law and prison reform.

By attracting a growing public audience of listeners year after year, Roberta and her wide-open conversations on Let the Truth Shine Radio Show led to citizen mobilization. Former prisoners, loved ones of inmates and their community supporters continue to organize today.

Ms. Franklin was named a "Soros Justice Fellow" by the Open Society Institute in 2004 for her activism in Alabama and her work with FMI. She also received the Excellence in Journalistic Broadcasting Award from The International Bannister Foundation, Critical Resistance South, Southern Center for Human Rights and the Patrick Crusade at the first Family Members of Inmates Convention in 2003.

Hosting meetings, marches and rallies that have drawn as many a two thousand participants, including notable political figures, Roberta Franklin founded and directs the Family and Friends of People Incarcerated, an organization that consists of relatives and friends of inmates throughout Alabama.

 

Roberta Franklin's call for a Million Family and Friends of Prisoners March on Washington D.C. on August 13, 2005 has been heard throughout the country.

Her relentless work for social justice brings Montgomery, Alabama another hard-won mark in the place of social justice history.

 

Ms. Franklin passed at her home on Saturday, January 5, 2013, surrounded by family friends.

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

Last Updated (Friday, 18 January 2013 18:56)

 

Artist Of the Month: T.K. Soul

TK SOUL: BORN TERENCE KIMBLE AUGUST 26TH. HOME STATE LOUISIANA (WINNFIELD). BEGAN HIS MUSICAL JOURNEY AT AGE 10 WHEN HE DISCOVERED HE COULD PLAY ANY INSTRUMENT HE CAME IN CONTACT WITH JUST BY EAR. HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC GREW IN HIS TEEN YEARS, AS HE WAS GREATLY INFLUENCED BY ENTERTAINERS HE SAW ON T.V. AND HEARD ON THE RADIO. BY AGE 13 HE WAS WRITING SONGS AND PLAYING GUITAR IN LOCAL AREA BANDS. FROM SCHOOL CHOIR TO CHURCH CHOIR JR. HIGH BAND TO HIGH SCHOOL BAND HIS TALENTS GREW VERY RAPIDLY. HE LEFT HOME AT 19 TRAVELING AND PERFORMING

Last Updated (Friday, 21 September 2012 17:08)

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Black Voices news and blog articles from The Huffington Post
  • Police In Ferguson Lock Up Peaceful Daytime Protesters By Mistake, Chief Testifies
    St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar, who helped oversee last month's aggressive response to protests in Ferguson, Missouri, said Monday that communications failures led police to lock up peaceful citizens during daytime hours.

    Belmar testified in federal court about the so-called five-second rule that police in Ferguson allowed protestors before enforcing Missouri's law against refusing to disperse. Though the statute only applies to individuals who refuse a police order to leave an "unlawful assembly, or at the scene of a riot," police in Ferguson repeatedly demanded crowds disperse during protests last month of a police officer's fatal shooting of Michael Brown, 18, who was unarmed.

    Police applied the rule to everyone, from protesters and journalists, to children and a 73-year-old woman. Even during daylight hours, officers arrested people who stopped moving for a few seconds, and threatened those who didn't keep in motion. The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri is suing both St. Louis County and St. Louis Highway Patrol over the enforcement of the law on behalf of protesters, seeking an injunction forbidding police from arresting protestors who are standing still.

    Belmar testified that the five-second rule was only supposed to be applied at night. Yet the rule was enforced during daylight. Even a news photographer was arrested during a peaceful daytime protest, apparently because he stopped on the sidewalk to take photos and wasn't inside the designated media area.

    Belmar said the...
  • Come Out Against Stigma, Live Out Proud

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    The fight against HIV/AIDS has always been about more than the search for medicine or a cure. It has been a battle for human dignity, to demonstrate that each life, regardless of race, sexual orientation, gender identity, nation of origin, or religion, has inherent value. From the beginning, this epidemic has taken the largest toll on our most marginalized communities. From gay men and transgender women to injection-drug users and people of color, those who are most often shut out of our nation's halls of affluence and power are also the most vulnerable to a whole host of health challenges, including HIV.

    A few days ago I had the honor of participating in a panel on HIV sponsored by U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee (D-California) at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation's Annual Legislative Caucus. During the event the always-inspiring Douglas Brooks, who is the first black gay man living with HIV to head the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, gave brief opening remarks in which he quoted the Bible, saying, "He came unto his own, and his own received him not" (John 1:11). As we once again marked National Gay Men's HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (Sept. 27), this simple verse resonated with me in a powerful way and seemed to reflect the position that so many gay men, especially gay men living with HIV, find themselves in.

    In almost every aspect of our lives, we are marginalized. Our employers...
  • Mr. President, Here's How to Help Ferguson Today: Give Youth Access to Federally Funded Jobs

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    In California, leaders of North Bay Organizing Project honored the 49th anniversary of regulations governing hiring on federal construction and other contracts by calling for changes that would help put America back to work and make sure employment of people of color more closely tracks with their participation in the work force. That could help address the problems at the root of the strife in Ferguson.



    Sept. 24 was the 49th anniversary of an important federal policy ensuring access to taxpayer-funded work for all Americans. Faith leaders in Gamaliel and our campaign arm, Transportation Equity Network, are holding actions to highlight the fact that, if we want to have something to celebrate when the policy turns 50 next year, the Obama administration has some serious catching up to do.

    Most people know affirmative action as a courtroom debate, but a similar policy began with a presidential order by President Lyndon Johnson Sept. 24, 1965. He ordered the Department of Labor to regulate the minority and female hiring of companies with federal construction contracts. LBJ opened the door to good-paying construction jobs for low-income people. Unfortunately, this giant step forward has not been supported by more recent presidents. The regulations were last updated in 1980 by President Jimmy Carter.

    "These numbers are out of date by more than three decades," says Irma Wallace, who is national co-chair of the Gamaliel jobs campaign and a leader with

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