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"First Lady Of Radio" ....Gone but never Forgotten

"FIRST LADY OF RADIO"

Roberta Franklin was a seasoned, social justice organizer living in Montgomery Alabama. Through her efforts, Roberta has garnered broad-based support from the general public and and national officials.

Several years ago, Roberta Franklin began to host a local radio talk show creating public conversations about hidden prisons and the people incarcerated in them. Good citizens of Alabama began to insist on sentencing law and prison reform.

By attracting a growing public audience of listeners year after year, Roberta and her wide-open conversations on Let the Truth Shine Radio Show led to citizen mobilization. Former prisoners, loved ones of inmates and their community supporters continue to organize today.

Ms. Franklin was named a "Soros Justice Fellow" by the Open Society Institute in 2004 for her activism in Alabama and her work with FMI. She also received the Excellence in Journalistic Broadcasting Award from The International Bannister Foundation, Critical Resistance South, Southern Center for Human Rights and the Patrick Crusade at the first Family Members of Inmates Convention in 2003.

Hosting meetings, marches and rallies that have drawn as many a two thousand participants, including notable political figures, Roberta Franklin founded and directs the Family and Friends of People Incarcerated, an organization that consists of relatives and friends of inmates throughout Alabama.

 

Roberta Franklin's call for a Million Family and Friends of Prisoners March on Washington D.C. on August 13, 2005 has been heard throughout the country.

Her relentless work for social justice brings Montgomery, Alabama another hard-won mark in the place of social justice history.

 

Ms. Franklin passed at her home on Saturday, January 5, 2013, surrounded by family friends.

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

Last Updated (Friday, 18 January 2013 18:56)

 

Artist Of the Month: T.K. Soul

TK SOUL: BORN TERENCE KIMBLE AUGUST 26TH. HOME STATE LOUISIANA (WINNFIELD). BEGAN HIS MUSICAL JOURNEY AT AGE 10 WHEN HE DISCOVERED HE COULD PLAY ANY INSTRUMENT HE CAME IN CONTACT WITH JUST BY EAR. HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC GREW IN HIS TEEN YEARS, AS HE WAS GREATLY INFLUENCED BY ENTERTAINERS HE SAW ON T.V. AND HEARD ON THE RADIO. BY AGE 13 HE WAS WRITING SONGS AND PLAYING GUITAR IN LOCAL AREA BANDS. FROM SCHOOL CHOIR TO CHURCH CHOIR JR. HIGH BAND TO HIGH SCHOOL BAND HIS TALENTS GREW VERY RAPIDLY. HE LEFT HOME AT 19 TRAVELING AND PERFORMING

Last Updated (Friday, 21 September 2012 17:08)

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Black Voices - The Huffington Post
Black Voices news and blog articles from The Huffington Post
  • Study: New Heart Failure Drug Shows Big Promise
    A new study reports one of the biggest potential advances against heart failure in more than a decade — a first-of-a-kind, experimental drug that lowered the chances of death or hospitalization by about 20 percent.

    Doctors say the Novartis drug — which doesn't have a name yet — seems like one of those rare, breakthrough therapies that could quickly change care for more than half of the 6 million Americans and 24 million people worldwide with heart failure.

    "This is a new day" for patients, said Dr. Clyde Yancy, cardiology chief at Northwestern University in Chicago and a former American Heart Association president.

    "It's been at least a decade since we've had a breakthrough of this magnitude," said Yancy, who had no role in the study.

    It involved nearly 8,500 people in 47 countries and was the largest experiment ever done in heart failure. It was paid for, designed and partly run by Novartis, based in Basel, Switzerland. Independent monitors stopped the study in April, seven months earlier than planned, when it was clear the drug was better than an older one that is standard now.

    During the 27-month study, the Novartis drug cut the chances of dying of heart-related causes by 20 percent and for any reason by 16 percent, compared to the older drug. It also reduced the risk of being hospitalized for heart failure by 21 percent.

    "We are really excited," said one study leader, Dr. Milton Packer of UT Southwestern...
  • Rihanna Spends Her Vacation In A Bikini
    In case you needed further proof that Rihanna's life is cooler than yours, here are some awesome vacation photos she shared on Twitter on Aug. 28 that will leave you with zero doubt.

    Here she is making history for being the first person to make binoculars look cool:

    0_0 pic.twitter.com/Wwz11ISvFn

    — Rihanna (@rihanna) August 28, 2014



    Then, when that got old, she chilled out with a glass of wine on her yacht because she's fabulous:

    pic.twitter.com/60J63BIkBp

    — Rihanna (@rihanna) August 28, 2014



    Later, Rihanna slipped into a yellow bikini and casually mentioned snorkeling in pirate caves:

    Went snorkeling by old pirate caves pic.twitter.com/IWRhkUf4xF

    — Rihanna (@rihanna) August 28, 2014



    Rihanna just wrapped up her Monster Tour with Eminem and is clearly taking some time to relax. We'd be lying if we said we weren't jealous!
  • Hip-Hop Moves As Strong Force For Michael Brown
    NEW YORK (AP) — Rappers are making their voices heard in song and on the ground in Ferguson, Missouri, in the wake of Michael Brown's shooting death, channeling hip-hop's earlier roots when the genre worked as a voice for the oppressed and spoke out against injustice.

    "It's really important to see hip-hop's role of being some grown-ups and doing some really stand-up, grown-up stuff," Public Enemy's Chuck D, one of rap's most powerful voices, said in a recent interview. "These people have actually stood up ... and that has to be saluted." The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer said he's impressed with rappers such as J. Cole, who released a heartaching, tearful song called "Be Free" inspired by Brown, the unarmed 18-year-old who was shot to death by a Ferguson officer on Aug. 9.

    Others in rap also have lifted their voices: Talib Kweli, like J. Cole, marched in Ferguson and spoke out about injustice; David Banner appeared on CNN; Nelly started a scholarship for teens in honor of Brown; and Lauryn Hill dedicated her song "Black Rage" — which uses some of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "My Favorite Things" — to the Ferguson community.

    "When the dogs bite, when the beatings, when I'm feeling sad I simply remember all these kinds of things and then I don't feel so bad," she sings.

    The largest hip-hop gesture for Brown, who was an aspiring rapper, came Wednesday when the Game released the song "Don't Shoot," in which...

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