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"First Lady Of Radio" ....Gone but never Forgotten

"FIRST LADY OF RADIO"

Roberta Franklin was a seasoned, social justice organizer living in Montgomery Alabama. Through her efforts, Roberta has garnered broad-based support from the general public and and national officials.

Several years ago, Roberta Franklin began to host a local radio talk show creating public conversations about hidden prisons and the people incarcerated in them. Good citizens of Alabama began to insist on sentencing law and prison reform.

By attracting a growing public audience of listeners year after year, Roberta and her wide-open conversations on Let the Truth Shine Radio Show led to citizen mobilization. Former prisoners, loved ones of inmates and their community supporters continue to organize today.

Ms. Franklin was named a "Soros Justice Fellow" by the Open Society Institute in 2004 for her activism in Alabama and her work with FMI. She also received the Excellence in Journalistic Broadcasting Award from The International Bannister Foundation, Critical Resistance South, Southern Center for Human Rights and the Patrick Crusade at the first Family Members of Inmates Convention in 2003.

Hosting meetings, marches and rallies that have drawn as many a two thousand participants, including notable political figures, Roberta Franklin founded and directs the Family and Friends of People Incarcerated, an organization that consists of relatives and friends of inmates throughout Alabama.

 

Roberta Franklin's call for a Million Family and Friends of Prisoners March on Washington D.C. on August 13, 2005 has been heard throughout the country.

Her relentless work for social justice brings Montgomery, Alabama another hard-won mark in the place of social justice history.

 

Ms. Franklin passed at her home on Saturday, January 5, 2013, surrounded by family friends.

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUEEN/FIRST LADY OF TALK RADIO

 

Last Updated (Friday, 18 January 2013 18:56)

 

Artist Of the Month: T.K. Soul

TK SOUL: BORN TERENCE KIMBLE AUGUST 26TH. HOME STATE LOUISIANA (WINNFIELD). BEGAN HIS MUSICAL JOURNEY AT AGE 10 WHEN HE DISCOVERED HE COULD PLAY ANY INSTRUMENT HE CAME IN CONTACT WITH JUST BY EAR. HIS LOVE FOR MUSIC GREW IN HIS TEEN YEARS, AS HE WAS GREATLY INFLUENCED BY ENTERTAINERS HE SAW ON T.V. AND HEARD ON THE RADIO. BY AGE 13 HE WAS WRITING SONGS AND PLAYING GUITAR IN LOCAL AREA BANDS. FROM SCHOOL CHOIR TO CHURCH CHOIR JR. HIGH BAND TO HIGH SCHOOL BAND HIS TALENTS GREW VERY RAPIDLY. HE LEFT HOME AT 19 TRAVELING AND PERFORMING

Last Updated (Friday, 21 September 2012 17:08)

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Black Voices - The Huffington Post
Black Voices news and blog articles from The Huffington Post
  • Ebola Outbreak Highlights Struggle for Science in Africa and Inequalities in Global Health Research
    As authorities scramble to contain the spread of Ebola, it helps to take a step back and examine why the science has not kept pace. Despite some promising advances in immunotherapy, there remains a great deal we haven't learned about the virus. In part, the lack of research in "non-profitable" infectious diseases occurring in underprivileged countries has left threats like Ebola largely unaddressed. In addition, inequalities within the system of international scientific collaboration have hindered African researchers from leading the way against diseases ravaging their continent.

    Similar concerns were echoed by the director of the National Institutes of Health, Francis Collins, who acknowledged in a recent interview that the quest for an Ebola vaccine in the United States had been slowed by a combination of lack of interest from the pharmaceutical industry and domestic budget cuts to basic research. With the arrival of the first Ebola patient on U.S. soil, however, the urgency to find a cure has hit home.

    Nonetheless, individual states cannot be expected to replace what needs to be a coordinated effort. Speakers at a security meeting last month acknowledged that investing in Africa's ailing healthcare infrastructure, while necessary, was unsustainable. What is needed are African solutions aimed at paving the way for science-based economies. In the words of Dr. Nkem Khumbah, "Africa needs science, not aid."

    Enter global health science. The past two decades have seen a rapid rise of academic programs in the United...
  • Meet The Hulking Young Stars Of Senegal -- Male Professional Wrestlers
    In Senegal, professional wrestling reigns supreme. Seeing as it's the national sport, those who successfully practice lutte sénégalaise, or laamb, are considered heroes in their home country, treated like movie stars or royalty. Though unlike the WWE stars in America who transformed wrestling into an entertainment spectacle throughout the '90s, the burgeoning wrestling champions in Senegal are reaching new heights of popularity while attempting to maintain ties to their traditional folk roots.

    Amsterdam-based photographer Ernst Coppejans recently spent several weeks shadowing the men and boys who are working to become the next big laamb champions. His portraits capture the hulking subjects on a beach in the small village of Yene where they train. Contorted and posed, mid-grapple or lounging by the sea, Coppejans' images demonstrate a different kind of masculinity.

    ernst


    The series, titled "Lutteur," began while Coppejans was traveling in West Africa, seeking to meet and photograph members of the gay community there. The resulting project, "Dans le Milieu," explores West Africa's laws that prohibit same sex relationships. While in Senegal, however, Coppejans became particularly fascinated with the wrestlers he saw on the beaches. After a bit of research, he decided to join the Senegalese hopefuls for a month, attending their tournaments and observing their practices.

    "Champions are worshiped," Coppejans explained to The Huffington Post. "Many Senegalese boys train fanatically to make their dream, becoming a famous lutteur come true." The allure...
  • Why I'm a Black Man Before I'm a Gay Man
    I'm much more aware of my identity as a black man than my identity as a gay man. I don't think of them as competing identities, but in the context of perception and the world, they are binary. Even as a young boy, I remember my mom telling me, "Sometimes you will be treated differently, and it will not always be right." I didn't exactly get it then, but as I grew older, I learned that my mom was trying to teach me about awareness.

    There's a certain type of painstakingly sharp and "always on" relentless awareness you just have to have as a black man in all spaces. It doesn't matter how many degrees you hold. It doesn't matter how much money you make. It doesn't matter where you live or what kind of car you drive; to some you're still a nigger, and that is the cold, hard truth about the world we live in today, and it's what my parents had to teach me growing up. I don't experience this with my identity as a gay man.

    At any point and in any space, I can choose not to disclose my sexuality, and thus be perceived as "straight." My sexuality isn't integrated into the rest of my life unless I allow it to be. But I can't wake up and say, "I think I want to enjoy being a white man today." Good luck. I don't superimpose my race into all circumstances and spaces, but...

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